Book review, Readathon, Wrap-up

Pride Readathon 2019 wrap-up

Statistics

Start Date: 1st June, 2019

End Date: 30th June, 2019

Total number of Books Read: 5

Highest rating: 5/5 stars

Lowest Rating: 3/5 stars

Best Book: Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Soanz


Last year in June I discovered Pride Readathon on Instagram where a couple of boys organised a month-long readathon with the aim of reading books in the LGBTQ+ genre. I discovered a lot of amazing books and read 5.5 of them. Here is a wrap-up of my Pride Readathon 2018. Although this year did not have an official readathon, some of us still continued it as Pride Readathon 2019. I read a total of 5 books this year and discovered even more amazing books that will probably be featured next year.


Here is a wrap-up of all the books that I read for the readathon:

  1. Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Soanz (5/5 Stars): This was my favorite book of the entire month. It is a deeply moving story that is relatable to people no matter what their age. I finished the book in a record two days which is saying something since I was juggling a full-time job and a crochet product to be made on order.
  2. Circus Folks and Village Freaks by Aparna Sanyal (5/5 Stars): A well written book that will have you wondering at the behaviour of the society even while chuckling at its eccentricities. As someone who doesn’t read a lot of poetry, I was pleasantly surprised at my reaction towards it. I also loved the illustrations at the beginning of each poem.
  3. The Upside of Unrequitted by Becky Albertalli (5/5 Stars): A beautiful story with well developed characters that tug at your heart. I read Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda and Leah on the Offbeat for Pride Readathon 2018. When one of my bookstagram buddies sent this book to me, I knew I had to read it for Pride this year. My favourite part was how the Peskin-Suso family looks so diverse from the outside but everyone is genuinely connected with each other and there is complete trust in their love for each other.
  4. Carry on by Rainbow Rowell (3/5 Stars): A fast paced book with varied characters that makes for a light reading. I loved how the author included characters from various ethnicity. I was pleasantly surprised to see so many Indian names and food mentioned in the story. 
  5. What If It’s Us by Becky Albertalli and Adam Silvera (4/5 Stars): I found some parts of the book a bit too slow and I wanted to shake the characters for their decisions but on the whole, it was a fun and light read.

Here is a list of books that I wanted to read for Pride:

  1. Maurice by E. M. Foster
  2. If I Was Your Girl by Meredith Russo
  3. They Both Die in the End by Adam Silvera
  4. History is All You Left Me by Adam Silvera
  5. Coffee Boy by Austin hant
  6. Boy Erased by Garrard Conley

Although I only read a handful of books for the readathon, I now have a mighty TBR to tackle. I was glad that all of the books that I read were wonderful and I look forward to reading the others on the list.


What did you do for the Pride Month?

Did you read anything that was LGBT related?

Tell me in the comments below or on my Instagram @the_food_and_book_life

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Musings, Wrap-up

Book Haul

Statistics

Number of Books: 9 IMG_20180811_102028_844

Date of Acquisition: 4th August, 2018


I had a weekend trip to Bangalore last month and it was the perfect opportunity to meet some of my fellow bookstagrammers. We call ourselves the Bookdivas and have wonderful discussions on things both related and unrelated to books, authors and stories. I got to meet Anupama and Nisha and we had a great time catching up.

What is a bookstagrammer meet without book exchange and book shopping? I brought books for my buddies while they had done to same for me. I gave Anupama Agatha Christie’s The Murder on the Links to help her complete her Agatha Christie reading goals while she gave me quite a few of her review copies like Yoddha- The Dynasty of Samudragupta by Rajat Pillai, If I Had to Tell it Again by Gayathri Prabhu, Harappa Trilogy by Shankar Kashyap and When the Lion Feeds by Wilbur Smith that she had received from another Bookdiva, Chitra. I had taken The Ministry of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy for Nisha but she had already read it so I gave that to Anupama as well and bought Goad Days by Benyamin for Nisha since she wanted to read more books by Malayali authors while she gave me The Wizards of Once by Cressida Coswell because I love fantasy.

We next set out to raid Blossoms Book House for more book shopping. Blossoms has been the go-to destination for all books, new and old, for decades. No trip to Bangalore is complete without a trip to Blossoms. I bought three books for myself keeping in mind the space constraints of storing them all. I had always wanted to read Salman Rushdie so I bought Shalimar the Clown. Book Thief by Markus Zusak had been on my TBR since a long time so I bought that as well. I had been feeling that I should read more of classics so I also bought Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. I thought I would be meeting another member of the Bookdivas group, Unnati while in Bangalore so I had bought for her Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman which I will now keep for myself because I love mythology.

I haven’t bought physical copies of books in a long time and it felt good lugging those books across town. I wish book sales come back to my city like they used to when I was young. But I now have a large number of physical book copies thanks review requests, my birthday book mails and books sent across by Chitra and I look forward to reading them all. I also look forward to meeting the other Bookdivas, the ones that I haven’t mentioned- Sneha and Jaanaki.


What was your recent book haul like?

How do you manage to find the space to store all of them?

Tell me in the comments below or on my Instagram @the_food_and_book_life

Book review, Readathon, Wrap-up

Pride Readathon 2018 wrap-up

Statistics

Total number of books: 5.5 PhotoGrid_1531034901929-min.jpg

Start date: 1st June, 2018

End date: 31st June, 2018

Highest Rating: 5/5 stars

Lowest Rating: DNF

Best Book: The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller


If you have been following my blog last month, you would have noticed that I took part in two readathons- The Pride Readathon hosted by Sai Ram and Dhruv Singhal and the Love is Love Readathon hosted by Books N Beyond. I wanted to do something special for the Pride Month in support of the LGBT community and being a bibliophile, this seemed like the perfect opportunity to popularize equal rights for them.

I had a wonderful time curating books for the readathon. I initially had 12 books on the list but I could only manage to complete five and a half because of other review deadlines. However, all the 5 reads were brilliant five star reads. I did not finish a book because it just did not do anything for me and I did not want to waste time with it.

Here is a wrap of the reads and the proposed reads for the Pride Readathon-

  1. Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli (5/5 stars) This book has been receiving a lot of eyeballs due to the recent movie adaptation and is considered to be one of the key books in recent LGBT literature so  I decided to start with this and boy, was I glad I did! The book deals with the coming of age of high school students, the discovery of their sexual identity, bullying, acceptance and the need to fit in. It was a very sweet story that was funny and had a lot of lovable characters. It had great family values as  well. I cannot wait to watch the movie.
  2. Less by Andrew Sean Greer– (5/5 stars) This was a story of a gay author, Arthur who discovers that he is nearing his fiftieth birthday with nothing to show for it. He sets out on a tour around the world in order to find new material for his book. It was a very ‘grown-up’ book with complex characters and discussion of serious issues regarding the way that the LGBT community has been perceived from the 70s to the present day. I was saddened to learn that on top of everything else that an author has to deal with, a gay author also has to deal with how his book will make the world percieve the gay community.
  3. The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller– (5/5 stars) This was my favourite book of the readathon and one of my favourite books overall. I love historic fiction and a descriptive story and this book gave me both of those things. It is a story of Patroclus and Achilles where we seen them grow up from innocent children to capable young adults. The protagonist is the underdog Patroclus and not the GodChild Achilles. I loved how even though the boy is not considered worthy of being friends with the Prince, Achilles should him nothing but equality.
  4. Leah on the Offbeat by Becky Albertalli– (5/5 stars) This was the second book in the Creekwood series after Simon. It concentrates on Leah, a lonely bisexual drummer who hasn’t come out to anyone other than her mother. She is tormented by longing and is confused by the attention that she receives from her supposed straight friend. The book deals with how straight people take it for granted to be handsy with gay people and don’t consider how it might come off as. It also deals with the feeling of being alone in a crowd and the loneliness that comes even when surrounded by a group of loving friends. This book spoke to me on levels that Simon did not reach.
  5. The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang–  (5/5 stars)This was my first graphic novel. I have never read much of comic books even as a kid and was apprehensive about how much I would really like this book. But I discovered that I loved the colorful images and the beautiful illustrations. The book tells a story of a Prince who likes to cross-dress. While cross-dressing is not purely inclusive in the LGBTQ+ genre, I considered the book since cross-dressing is identified as a type of transgender behaviour but does not necessarily indicate transgender identity.
  6. The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth- I had very high expectations for this book. It is the story of Cameron, a young teen who is just realising her sexuality and is (mis)educated about it by her Aunt in the hopes of bringing her close to God. I however found the writing too monotonous. I did read 50% of the book but could not bring myself to finish it. It is one of the few books that have gone into the DNF category for me.

Here is also a list of the books that were on my TBR list for the Pride Readathon but did not get read due to time constraints-

  1. Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz
  2. Maurice by E. M. Foster
  3. If I Was Your Girl by Meredith Russo
  4. They Both Die in the End by Adam Silvera
  5. History is All You Left Me by Adam Silvera
  6. The Upside of Unrequitted by Becky Albertalli

Although I only read a handful of books for the readathon, I now have a mighty TBR to tackle. I was glad that all of the books that I read were wonderful and I look forward to reading the others on the list.


What did you do for the Pride Month?

Did you read anything that was LGBT related?

Tell me in the comments below or on my Instagram @the_food_and_book_life

Book review, Readathon, Wrap-up

Mid-Year Wrap-up

Statistics

Total Number of Books: 62

Start date: 1st January, 2018

End Date: 30th June, 2018

5 star reads– 18 books

4 star reads– 16 books

3 star reads– 23 books

2 star reads– 5 books

1 star reads– 0 books


Best book so far– The Song of Achilles by Madelline Miller
Best sequel– A Court of Frost and Starlight by Sarah J. Mass
Recent release I want to read– Homefire by Kamila Shamsie
Most anticipated release– The Good Fight by Danielle Steel
Biggest disappointment– The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth
Biggest surprise– Mango People in Banana Republic by Robert Vadra
Favorite new author– A. J. Finn
Book that made me cry– When I Hit You by Meena Kandasamy
Most beautiful book that I acquired- Circe by Madelline Miller
A book that made me smile- Leah on the Offbeat by Becky Albertalli
Favorite review that I have written- When I Hit You, Between the Grooves
Books to read before the year ends– Beartown by Fredrik Backman, All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

I began blogging about books in the end of 2017. As 2018 began, I started to get a feel of what it was to be a book blogger, a book reviewer and a bookstagrammer. I started to make friends all over the community, I started to receive free review copies and I started to make connections with publication houses and distributors.

I had a great half year. I had some pretty awesome reads, I also had some abysmal reads. I lived, I learnt and now I am a bit wiser (maybe?) before I accept review copies. I became a part of the Brindi Quinn street team and got to read all of her amazing books, I also became a part of M.C. Frank’s team and got to read some of her books. I became a part of Kate Tilton’s team of book reviewers and also a part of M.C. Frank’s team of Book Robin Hoods.

I found my book divas, I had great buddy reads with b0rn_2_read, missreadsalottt, chitrahaanthem, inkless.sne, the_folded_page, fromthejournalofareader and celebrity.reads. I also discovered book clubs hosted by dr.snob and one by Rashi where I got to read a variety of books and discuss them with other book lovers. I also participated in four readathons- two hosted by Books N Beyond, One Pride Readathon hosted by Sai Ram and Dhruv Singhal and one Women centric March readathon, all of which were great experiences! To top everything off, I received books as giveaway wins and as birthday bookmails. This makes one happy bibliophile!

So here is a wrap-up of all of my reads for the first half of 2018-

5 star reads. Criteria- I loved the story and/or the style of writing, the story/concept was unique, the sentence structure, spelling, and grammar were perfect.

The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang, When I Hit you by Meena Kandasamy, Leah on the Offbeat by Becky Albertalli, The Song of Achilles by Madelline Miller, Less by Andrew Sean Greer, Bill the Jungle Octopus by Angela Pink, Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli, Mango People in Banana Republic by Vishak Shakti, Submit by Brady Bradford, The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon, A Court of Frost and Starlight by Sarah J. Mass, Atto’s Tale by Brindi Quinn, Malhaar by Ambica Uppal, Lose Me by M.C. Frank, A Girl Like That by Tanaz Bathena, Cuckold by Kiran Nagarkar, Sil in a Dark World by Brindi Quinn, Police Officer Penny by Claire Harrison

4 star reads. Criteria- I liked the story and/or the style of writing, the story/concept was reasonably unique, the sentence structure, spelling, and grammar were perfect.

Nightborne by Brindi Quinn, Flying Without Wings by Rishabh Puri, Magic ten and Beyond by Shanon Ganon, Operation Pied Piper by Jean Daish, Between the Grooves by Steve Dickinson, Nagin by Mayur Didolkar, No Ordinary Star by M.C. Frank, The Adventures of Tootsie Lama by Stuti Agarwal, The Fate of Farellah by Brindi Quinn, Animal Farm by George Orwell, The Brahmin by Ravi Shankar Etteth, Hush a Bye Baby by Deepanjana Pal, The Moon of Farellah by Brindi Quinn, Heart of Farellah by Brindi Quinn, The Tree House by Glenn Haybittle, Great Grandma Joins the Circus by Lois Davis,

3 star reads. Criteria- The story/concept was not unique but was written well, the sentence structure, spelling, and grammar were good.

Love of My Life by Rohit Sharma, Trust Me Not by Ankita Verma Dutta, The Water Rabbits by Paul Tarrago, The White Room by C.M. Albert, Prodigy Prince by Natasha Sapienza, The Boy by Nrupal Das, Letters to my Ex by Nikita Singh, Operation Hailstorm by Brett Arquette, This Love of Mine by Soumi Dutta, The Crowns of Croswald by D.E. Night, Earth to Centauri by Kumar L, Start-up Fiance by Shilpa Mudiganti, Kansa by Prassanth Kevin, Twenty-nine Going on Thirty by Andaleeb Wajid, Surrealist Awakenings by Amanda Fleet, The Fragile Thread of Hope by Pankaj Giri, Seconds by Brindi Quinn, The Relic by Ashwin Sharma and Karthik, The Eternity Duet by Brindi Quinn, A Hundred Little Flames by Preeti Shenoy, The World Remains by Brindi Quinn, Ruined by M.C. Frank, Nevernight by Jay Kristoff

2 star reads. Criteria- I did not like the story/concept, the sentence structure, spelling, and grammar were not good.

Till the End of Forever by Vivaksh Singh, Living on the Edge by Chanchal Jain, Chakravyuh- The Land of Paharias by Jitendra Attra, Something I Never Told You by Shravya Bhinder, Undelivered Letters by J. Alchem

Review Copies. Criteria- Physical copies or ebooks received from the author, publisher or distributor for the purpose of review.

Nightborne by Brindi Quinn, Till the End of Forever by Vivaksh Singh, Flying Without Wings by Rishab Puri, Magic ten and Beyond by Shanon Ganon, Operation Pied Piper by Jean Daish, Bill the Jungle Octopus by Angela Pink, Love of My Life by Rohit Sharma, Between the Grooves by Steve Dickinson, Trust Me Not by Ankita Verma Dutta, Nagin by Mayur Didolkar, Mango People in Banana Republic by Vishak Shakti, Submit by Brady Bradford, The Water Rabbits by Paul Tarrago, Living on the Edge by Chanchal Jain, No Ordinary Star by M.C. Frank, Atto’s Tale by Brindi Quinn, The White Room by C.M. Albert, The Fate of Farellah by Brindi Quinn, The Brahmin by Ravi Shankar Etteth, Chakravyuh- The Land of Paharias by Jitendra Attra, Malhaar by Ambica Uppal, Prodigy Prince by Natasha Sapienza, The Boy by Nrupal Das, The Moon of Farellah by Brindi Quinn, Letters to my Ex by Nikita Singh, Operation Hailstorm by Brett Arquette, This Love of Mine by Soumi Dutta, Lose Me by M.C. Frank, The Crowns of Croswald by D.E. Night, A Girl Like That by Tanaz Bathena, Something I Never Told You by Shravya Bhinder, Earth to Centauri by Kumar, Start-up Fiance by Shilpa Mudiganti, Heart of Farellah by Brindi Quinn, Kansa by Prassanth Kevin, Twenty-nine Going on Thirty by Andaleeb Wajid, Surrealist Awakenings by Amanda Fleet, The Fragile Thread of Hope by Pankaj Giri, Sil in a Dark World by Brindi Quinn, Seconds by Brindi Quinn, The Tree House by Glenn Haybittle, The Eternity Duet by Brindi Quinn, Great Grandma Joins the Circus by Lois Davis, Police Officer Penny by Claire Harrison, The Relic by Ashwin Sharma and Karthik, A Hundred Little Flames by Preeti Shenoy, The World Remains by Brindi Quinn, Ruined by M.C. Frank, Undelivered Letters by J. Alchem

Readathons

I participated in 4 readathons. The first was a Women Centric March Readathon in the month of March where I read books with a female author and/or a strong female character. The next was the Slay the TBR readathon hosted in May by Books N Beyond with three prompts- A book with less than 200 pages, A book that I had abandoned, A book included in a Books N Beyond box. The next was the Love is Love readathon hosted in June by Books N Beyond with three prompts- A book from the LGBT genre/ a genre that I had never tried before, A 2018 release, A book included in a Books N Beyond box. Along with this, I also participated in the Pride Readathon hosted by Sai Ram and Dhruv Singhal in June where I read books from the LGBTQ+ genre.

The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang (Pride Readathon & 2nd Books N Beyond readathon), Leah on the Offbeat by Becky Albertalli (Pride Readathon & 2nd Books N Beyond readathon), The Song of Achilles by Madelline Miller (Pride Readathon & 2nd Books N Beyond readathon), Less by Andrew Sean Greer (Pride Readathon), Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli (Pride Readathon), The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon (1st Books N Beyond Readathon), Living on the Edge by Chanchal Jain (1st Books N Beyond Readathon), No Ordinary Star by M.C. Frank (1st Books N Beyond Readathon), Kansa by Prassanth Kevin (Women centric March Readathon), Twenty-nine Going on Thirty by Andaleeb Wajid (Women centric March Readathon), Surrealist Awakenings by Amanda Fleet (Women centric March Readathon), Lose Me by M.C. Frank (Women centric March Readathon), The Crowns of Croswald by D.E. Night (Women centric March Readathon), A Girl Like That by Tanaz Bathena (Women centric March Readathon), Something I Never Told You by Shravya Bhinder (Women centric March Readathon), Earth to Centauri by Kumar (Women centric March Readathon), Start-up Fiance by Shilpa Mudiganti (Women centric March Readathon), Heart of Farellah by Brindi Quinn (Women centric March Readathon)

Book Clubs

I am a part of the book club hosted by Rashi where we read and discussed When I Hit You by Meena Kandasamy. We are now reading The Hate You Give for the next discussion. I am also a part of the book club hosted by dr.snob where we read The Woman in The Window by A.J. Finn and will be discussing it in the middle of July.


How has your book blogging journey been?

Tell me in the comments below or on my Instagram @the_food_and_book_life

Book review, Musings, Wrap-up

Wrap-up of my ‘Women Centric March’ reads

statistics

Total number of books: 10

Start date: March 1st, 2018

End date: March 31th, 2018

Highest rating: 5/5 stars

Lowest rating: 2/5 stars

Best book: A Girl Like That by Tanaz Bhathena


People who know me, know that I am a feminist. Always have been, always will be. So it was great to see people on Bookstagram start readathons and make special hashtags (#femmemarch by @thebooksatchel and #femmemarchfest by @theliquidsunset to name a few) for the month of March to celebrate Women’s Day. I tried to read books written by female authors or books with strong female characters throughout the month and here is a wrap-up of them.

  1. Surrealist Awakenings by Amanda Fleet. (3/5 stars)

I received this book from Olympia Publishers and was very excited to read it. I love quirky retellings of old stories and this promised to have stories from Greek mythology to popular fairy tales. Although I am still not sure if I liked the book, it definitely did deliver in the ‘quirky’ department.

2. Twenty-nine Going on Thirty by Andaleeb Wajid (3.5/5 stars)

I received this book from Penguin Random House Publishers. It is a story of four girls in their late twenties and the judgement that they face from the society. It was very relatable and was perfect for raising women empowerment issues in the month of March. It spoke of how single women are expected to behave in a certain way and how it is important for women to support each other and pull each other up. It only lost points because of the lack of research from the author.

3. Kansa by Prassanth Kevin (3/5 stars)

Although it isn’t written by a female author, it featured Saargi Desai, a strong, smart and beautiful police woman who is loyal to her country. It is great to see Indian writing that shows a public service officer in a positive light. Where women are stereotyped and corrupt officers are the norm, it was wonderful to read about a woman who went against all of these preconceived notions.

4. Heart of Farellah by Brindi Quinn (4/5 stars)

As a part of the Brindi Quinn Street Team of Review Warriors, I received the first book in the Farellah series in March. Brindi is an accomplished author and is well known for creating unique characters. Heart of Farellah is a story of a songstress, Aura who is destined to save the world. All of Brindi Quinn’s books contain beautiful imagery of magical worlds with characters that we love and love to hate. I have read the next book in the series and am in love with it. I cannot wait to see how it ends.

5. Startup Fiance by Shilpa Mudiganti (3/5 stars)

A book set in New York, it is a story of two CEOs who love their job above all else until they meet each other. The book read a bit too much like a Bollywood movie for my taste but for a first-time author, it was a good effort.

6. Earth to Centauri: The First Journey by Kumar L (3/5 stars)

A book set in the year 2117, Earth to Centauri is a Sci-fi story of the brave Captain Anara. Again, a book that isn’t written by a female author but one that features a strong female character. I was glad to see that a young woman was the lead astronaut who discovered a new planet. She also manages to keep her head in crisis and deals with the possibilities of an intergalactic war diplomatically. It was a nice change to see that the lady did not depend on the men on her team even for help of the ‘technical’ kind.

7. Something I never Told You by Shravya Binder (2/5 stars)

A very disappointing book that I wish I had not wasted my time on. It is a story of a man who fails to tell the girl of his dreams that he is in love with her. As typical love stories go, they almost get together but a silly misunderstanding tears them apart only to meet a few months later to re-start something that seemed doomed to me even before it began. The book gives off a very strong ‘Bollywood’ vibe right from the first page and did not impress me in the least.

8. A Girl Like That by Tanaz Bhathena (5/5 stars)

If I could give this book 10 stars, I would. This is by far the best book that I have read this year and that’s saying something as I’ve 29 read books so far. It is a story of 16-year-old Zarin, an orphan who lives with her Aunt and Uncle in Jeddah. She does not conform to the society’s expectations of the ‘correct’ behaviour for a girl and is shunned by her peers and family for it. She struggles to form connections and fails to find people to confide in. She deals with her loneliness by hardening her heart and this backfires with people labeling her as a rebel. She has to deal with abuse, abandonment and depression with no one by her side. She is a brave young girl who’s story is sure to resonate with millions of girls around the world who are dealing with similar situations. Did I say that it is one of my favourite books ever?

9. Crowns of Croswald by D.E Night (3.5/5 stars)

Catered to the readers who grew up on Harry Potter, Crowns of Croswald is a fantasy fiction that takes place in a school of magic. Ivy discovers that she has magic in her after working as a maid for 16 years. A Harry Potter + Cinderella Deja Vu anyone? It contained a few characters like the Hairies that were interesting but the introduction of too many twists in the tale threw me off for a bit. I was glad that Ivy was strong and managed to deal with all the magical creatures on her own without too much of help from the men. It does have the potential for a making a good series but we will have to wait and see.

10. Lose Me. by M.C. Frank (5/5 stars)

This is another book that broke my heart and is sure to stay with me for a long time. It is a story of Ari, a stunt girl who cathes the eye of a movie star. What is great about the book is that Ari does not turn into a simpering little girl even with all the attention that the heartthrob throws her way. Even with her blinding headaches, she makes sure that she completes her stunts. A great work ethic if I ever saw one. She does not need the protection of her brother nor her boyfriend but is mature enough to realise that she does not need to go through life alone. Her sense of fear at things going wrong, her love for her job and her strength at the worst of times were wonderful to read. I was glad that this particular book was the last women-centric books that I read for the month of  March


Did you do anything special for March?

Tell me in the comments below or on Instagram @the_food_and_book_life