Book review, Readathon, Received for Review

Circus Folks and Village Freaks by Aparna Upadhyaya Sanyal

Statistics

Length: 156 pages

Format: Hardcover

Genre: Poetry, LGBTQ+

Publisher: Vishwakarma Publications

Date of Publication: 20th September, 2018

Rating: 4.5/5 stars

Disclaimer: I receiver a free copy of the book in exchange for an honest review


When the author contacted me about reviewing the book, I was amazed at the beautiful cover. The concept was intriguing and it seemed like an interesting read. I usually research a book before accepting a review opportunity but something about this book had me saying yes almost immediately.

The Blurb

Meet the beautiful people of the Circus, and the freaks who live in the Village next to them. Mangled, jangled, misunderstood, all find place in the rich tapestry of this book.

Siamese twins separate to lose half a heart each, and find snake-man and tiger-taming lovers. A man bitten by a crocodile becomes a God, and a Devadasi woos the entire countryside with her culinary artistry.

Fates intertwined lead sometimes to tragedy, sometimes happy summits of fame. A clown finds his place in Hollywood and mute animals break unspeakable chains. A twisted man falls in love with a mirror and a white man is unmade by the Indian sun.

In this book are tales for every season and every reason. Tales of human depravity that take innocent lives, and of a murderers’ insanity that follows, a fitting revenge by nature, red in tooth and claw.

These stories are told in the form of narrative poems in rhyming couplets.

Look inside and you will find, you have been to this Village. Surely, you have been to this Circus too.

The Book

I always consider myself as a ‘prose over poetry’ sort of person. I was apprehensive about how I would react to this book. However, I was pleasantly surprised to see that the author knew what she was doing. The lines were wonderfully symmetrical and lyrical and the icing on the cake was that they rhymed perfectly. 

I was glad that I read the book in June since it contributed towards my Pride Readathon. The book consists of short poems based on quirky characters. We see children born in affluent families who are discarded because they do not conform to society’s idea of perfection. We see husbands and wives come to terms with their differences. We see greedy landlords and circus masters get their comeuppance. We see individuals from the fringes of the society find acceptance and also individuals who are banished or killed for their difference in appearance, behaviour or sexual orientation.

Even though the book talks about freaks and oddities of nature, the general feeling is one of positivity and humor. The women in the stories are strong and independent and find their place in the world and enjoy what they are doing despite being despised by a select few. I enjoyed how the author connected a story towards the end of the book with one in the beginning. That goes to show how much planning actually went into writing and editing.

The Author

Aparna Upadhyaya Sanyal holds an MA from Kings College, London. She is a recipient of the 14th Beullah Rose Poetry Prize by Smartish Pace. She was shortlisted for the Third Coast Fiction Prize, 2018. She is featured on the Masthead of the Songs of Eretz Poetry Review as a Frequent Contributor. A popular Spoken Word poet, she performs at events across venues in India. Her page poetry is featured in reputed international literary journals such as Smartish Pace, Dunes Review, Typehouse Literary Review, SOFTBLOW, Broad River Review, Gyroscope Review and many more. Her poetry will be anthologized alongside the work of renowned poets such as Gulzar and Piyush Mishra in 2019. She lives with her 4-year-old son, husband and two dog babies in Pune, India.


TL;DR: A well written book that will have you wondering at the behaviour of the society even while chuckling at its eccentricities


Do you like reading poetry?

What are your favourites?

Tell me in the comments below or on my Instagram @the_food_and_book_life

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Book review, Readathon

The Fisher Queen’s Dynasty by Kavita Kane

Statistics

Format: Paperback

Length: 325 pages

Genre: Mythology

Publisher: Westland Books

Date of Publication: 15th December, 2017

Rating: 3.5/5 stars


I had won this book in one of the very first giveaways that I had entered on Instagram but I hadn’t been able to read it for more than a year. Finally this March, I wanted to read books by female authors depicting strong women and this seemed perfect. I buddy read it with Anupama and had a ice time discussing the book with her.


The Blurb

‘I learnt to love like a man—to love without feelings. And I shall never forget this lesson.’

Matsyagandha, Daseyi, Yojanagandha — the queen of Hastinapur, Satyavati. Abandoned as a baby, preyed on by a rishi, she hardens herself, determined that the next time she is with a man, she will be the one to win. And win she does: the throne of Hastinapur for herself, and the promise that her sons will be heirs to the kingdom. But at what cost?

In a palace where she is disdained and scorned, Satyavati must set aside her own loss and pain if she is to play the game of politics. She learns to be ruthless, unscrupulous — traits that estrange her from everyone around. Everyone, except the man she cheated of his birthright.

A piercing, insightful look at the grand matriarch of the Kuru family, the woman who set off the sequence of events that ended in the bloody battle of Kurukshetra, The Fisher Queen’s Dynasty will re-align your reading of the Mahabharata.

The Book

I love reading different views of a known story. The story of Bhishma has always been told from his perspective and rightly so, with him being a fierce warrior and a just administrator. However, for his life to play out the way that it did, a lot of people’s lives were also intermingled in the tragedy. I always knew the story of Satyavathi as a catty woman who only cared about power. I never once wondered why that might be so. It is rightly said that history (or in this case, mythology) is told according to the whims and fancies of the victor. The victors here are the spoilt and pampered males in Satyavathi’s life who found it convenient to blame the unfortunate woman whose only fault was her ambition.

Although Sathyavathi was not moral or even right in most situations, she was true to her goals and kept her eye on the prize. She remained loyal to the crown till the very end. I did not like the way she kept manipulating Bhishma at every turn but I understood where her fire was coming from. She was tired of being the victim of fate and wanted to take things into her own hands and be responsible for everything that happened in her life, be it good or bad.

I loved how she was one of the original feminists. She considered herself equal to any man and did not understand why she needed to be subservient to anyone. She was smart and wily and her will power ensured that she got what she wanted. I was dismayed at how Amba was a mere pawn in the game of politics even though she was a princess. The status of women was decided only based on their construed purity, beauty, and their father’s status. I was glad to have read the story from the point of view of a woman who till now was considered opportunistic and evil. The book is well written although I felt like it contained unnecessarily long conversation in some places.

The Author

A senior journalist with a career of over two decades, which includes working for Magna publication and DNA, Kavita Kane quit her job as Assistant Editor of Times of India to devote herself as a full time author. A self-styled aficionado of cinema and theatre and sufficiently armed with a post-graduate degree in English Literature and Mass Communication from the University of Pune, the only skill she knows, she candidly confesses, is writing.
Born in Mumbai, a childhood spent largely in Patna and Delhi , Kavita currently lives in Pune with her mariner husband Prakash and two daughters Kimaya and Amiya with Chic the black Cocker Spaniel and Cotton the white, curious cat. 

Her work include;

  1. Karna’s Wife- The Outcast’s Queen (2013)
  2. Sita’s Sister (2014)
  3. Menaka’s Choice (2015)
  4. Lanka’s Princess (2016)
  5. The Fisher Queen’s Dynasty (2017)

TL;DR: A different look at a popular mythology that makes you sympathetic towards characters that you hadn’t liker earlier.


What was your favourite mythology story growing up?

Tell me in the comments below or on my Instagram @the_food_and_book_life

Book review, Received for Review

She Wants Out and Other Stories by Kiran Jhamb

Statistics

Format: Paperback

Genre: Feminism, Short Stories

Length: 70 pages

Publisher: Dattsons Publishers

Date of Publication: 2013

Rating: 4.5/5 stars

Disclaimer: I received a free copy of the book in exchange for an honest review


As a part of the review program by Book Pitaara, I received She Wants Out and Other Stories as a review copy along with Pride March. I like reading short stories as a break between heavy reads.


The Blurb

Being a woman at some stage or other you realize how you were coaxed and coerced to become a round peg to fit a round hole. You couldn’t be allowed to turn into a square peg because then you wouldn’t have fitted into the slot which the society allows you. Everyone embarks on a quest for happiness and harmony. One has to make choices, provided one views oneself as having choices. These stories are about women – some, who were content to drift and others who tried to usher in a change. They have an appeal for every reader. They can be read passively or actively – passively for entertainment or actively for reflection. They stress on the need of independence in a woman’s life – a freedom from stuck-up cultural norms because the old rules are not always right.

The Book

I loved how small each story was but how much emotion was packed into each of it. Most of the stories could be read on a short coffee break but you cannot read the entire book in one go because the stories make you think.

I find that short stories are a gamble. When they are well written, you don’t want them to end but with others, the lack of depth is glaringly obvious. I wasn’t sure what I would find with She Wants Out and Other Stories by Kiran Jhamb but since it was women’s month and this was a book that dealt with women and the reality of their lives, I thought it would be appropriate to read it then. And boy, was I glad that I did!
The book describes the lives of women that we all know and commiserate with. The reason that I loved every story was that there are certain aspects in each female character that I am sure we could all identify with. I loved that the author provided a realistic and often humorous look at everyday situations and managed to weave intricate stories in just two or three pages. I enjoyed each perspective and was glad that there was a representation of women from every decade of life. We see women dealing with the loss of their freedom and their right to choose, having to put up with inequality and abuse because the perpetrators are ‘family’ and having to live up to other people’s expectations even though it might not be the right thing for them.
I was pleasantly surprised by how much I loved the book and would love to read more of the author’s work.

The Author

Dr. Kiran Jhamb is an Associate Professor and the Dead of the Department of English in JMT Arts and JJP Science College, Nagpur. She has more than a hundred stories, poems and articles to her credit which have been published in different newspapers and magazines. She has also written two books.

Her work include:

  1. Wise to be a Fool
  2. Family Dustbin
  3. She wants out and Other Stories

TL;DR: A book filled with interesting short stories that deal with important social issues in a concise manner and leave you with enough emotions to last the entire day


What are some of your favourite short story collections?

Tell me in the comments below or on my Instagram @the_food_and_book_life

Book review, Received for Review

The Code of Manavas by Arpit Bakshi

Statistics

Format: Paperback

Length: 280 pages

Genre: Indian Literature, Mythology, Science fiction

Publisher: Rupa Publications

Date of Publication: 10th July, 2018

Rating: 2.5/5 stars

Disclaimer: I received a free copy of the book in exchange for an honest review


The Code of Manavas is the first book in the Maha Vishnu Trilogy. It has been quite a while since I’ve read any sci-fi and Indian mythology is always fun to read so I was very excited to read the book.


The Blurb

Book one of the Maha Vishnu Trilogy, The Code of Manavas, is set some two million years past ad 2050, when earth as we know it ceased to exist and so did mankind. A new race, the Manavas, now exists on Bhoomi, the erstwhile Earth, which is divided into two cities—Madhavpur and Ayudhpur. In the quiet and peaceful city of Madhavpur, a reclusive Krishna is busy with an immense task. He has to prepare a new abode for the Manavas before an impending apocalypse destroys them. He knows something that nobody else does—the Manavas are running out of time faster than they can imagine and there are no inhabitable planets to escape to. To make matters worse, there is someone in Madhavpur who wants to destroy Krishna and subjugate each Manava. The Manavas, it seems, are doomed. Yet Krishna knows there is a slim chance of survival for the Manavas, although there is a huge price to be paid for it. Will the various factions of the Manavas unite for the greater good? Will Krishna, who saved them during the turn of the last Yuga, be able to save them now? What will be the price to pay? Enter the mythical world of Maha Vishnu and get swept up in a fast-paced suspenseful narrative.

The Book

The book is set in the future and begins with the description of an advanced group of people called Manavas who have evolved from humans with the help of a mysterious element, Bhoomodium. Bhoomodium increases the cognitive efficacy of the people and also renders them immortal but it has other consequences that they discover as time progresses. The author’s research on cosmic phenomenon and scientific facts regarding brain functioning is apparent throughout the book. The Krishna in the Swarnim Yuga and the Krishna that we all know from the Dwapara Yuga have been connected to each other in a variety of interesting angles but I wish that they had been explored more.

While the first couple of chapters were engaging, the book started to veer off into expected tangents as the story progressed. The introduction of a tragic love story and a partial love triangle seemed unnecessary seeing that it did not play any role in plot development. It seemed half-hearted with the introduction of the characters of Vallabha and Meera who was created just to satisfy the author’s need to introduce female characters into the story. The lack of representation of women as lead characters or even as council members irked me but what really upset me was how the other women were depicted. The so-called ‘guide’ who knows the lay of the land ends up twisting her ankle and having to be carried by the man, she does not notice that a Leopard is stalking her even though it is her job to collect samples and must always be aware of her surroundings. She is then again rescued by the ‘hero’ of the story. The woman who claims to be strong and is outdoorsy falls off the boat at the beginning of the journey and needs to doze and rest while the man who hardly ever ventures out of his lab gets them to their destination. A very obvious ‘damsel in distress rescued by the brilliant man’ theme was apparent throughout the book. The women were all portrayed as having only romance on their minds with both Vallabha and Radhika needing validation of their feelings from Krishna.

The book was slow in some parts but skipped over details in others. The sentence flow did not seem consistent, almost like it was edited by multiple people at multiple places and it was not brought together in the end. The plot was pretty much see-through throughout the book and none of the characters were particularly likable to me.

The Author

Arpit Bakshi studied electrical engineering and has an MBA in finance from the University of RPI, Troy, New York. He now works for a prominent Indian bank. Arpit initially wanted to pursue a career in theoretical physics, but ended up opting for engineering (as most students of science in India tend to do). Since his childhood, two things have never failed to amaze him—the vast expanse of the cosmos; and the unfathomable depth of Indian mythology and spirituality. He believes that one should never stop learning and it is his love for science that has gravitated him towards writing this mythology-inspired science fiction. Arpit is based in Gurgaon, India.


TL;DR: A book with a promising premise that unfortunately does not deliver on its promise


What is your favourite science fiction?

Tell me in the comments below or on my Instagram @thefoodandbooklife

Book review, Received for Review

Men and Dreams in the Dhauladhar by Kochery C. Shibu

Statistics

Format: Paperback

men and dreams in the dhauladhar

Length: 283 pages

Genre: Fiction

Publisher: Niyogi Books

Date of Publication: 3rd August, 2015

Rating: 2.5/5 stars

Disclaimer: I received a free copy of the book in exchange for an honest review


I had seen this book doing the rounds on Bookstagram and was curious. When the author asked me if I would review the book, I was a bit apprehensive with all the warnings that I was given regarding the technical aspects in the book. But I was also curious since I have been known to end up liking technically sound books.


The Blurb

A hydro power project in the remote Himalayas.
Three people brought together by fate. Nanda, an engineer from Kerala at the dam construction site hiding from his past, from the law, torn between the love of his dear ones and the traditional kalari code of revenge.
Khusru, a boy displaced from his native village in Kashmir, a gambit in the terror plot threatening to blow up the dam, working as a labour at the site.
Rekha, a Kathak dancer in heart, a doctor by profession, arrives at the campsite as the consort of Khusru.
A village that accepts the dictates of modernity with a heavy heart, its population steeped in superstitions and religious beliefs.
All throng the camp site like moths to a flame. Some escape untouched,successful; some miss a step and perish.
Each has a story to tell and a dream to realize. The fury of nature and hardship of project life has no mercy for the weak and time for the dead.
Like an eternal spectator the Dhauladhar watches as men risk their limb and life in their quest to full fill their dreams.

The Book

The book is divided into chapters that describe the life of different characters and how the choices of each person lead them towards a common destiny. I love books that take what look like random strangers and build the story in a way that their life decisions interconnect them with each other to form a common story. It was nice to see the book achieve this goal towards the end. The beginning of the book was also intriguing where the author gives us backstory to each character. The middle of the book though felt a bit too long.

I always prefer dialogue and action over description. That being said, I have liked descriptive books when the descriptions help make the story. Unfortunately, in this book, I felt that the descriptions did not do much to further the story. Had all the part of dam building and interaction between the workers been removed, the story would not have really changed. It just felt like fluff that the author added to increase the number of pages of the book to an acceptable amount. Had he concentrated more on the military aspects of terrorism or just concentrated on the intricacies of each character like he did in the beginning, it would have made for a better reading. I was surprised to find that I almost liked the actual technical aspects of building of the dam. It was the frivolous conversations between the labourers and the mundane details of their lives that got to me. The random use of vernacular also felt unnecessary. The author may have tried to bring in authenticity to the story by incorporating slangs but it did not flow smoothly and made for a very jarring reading experience.

The descriptions of the mountains, the terrains, and snow-capped peaks reminded me of my own trip to Kashmir, Darjeeling, and Gangtok. The premise of the terrorist with good intentions, the brilliant girl with a wild heart, and the simple man forced into a family feud were believable having grown up watching Bollywood movies in the same vein. I would have loved to read more on each character in order to make them feel more real. I would also have liked to see what happened to the terrorists’ plan and to know the reason for them picking the Dhauladhar dams as their site of terror attacks. It felt like the book ended a tad too abruptly.

The Author

Kochery C Shibu graduated from the prestigious National Defence Academy in 1981. He has served in the Indian Navy and commanded two warships. Post his retirement he has executed hydroelectric projects in the Cauvery river basin in Karnataka, Beas river basin in Himachal and Teesta river basin in Sikkim. He holds a postgraduate degree in Defence Studies from Chennai University, and MA in English literature from Pune University.
Men and Dreams in the Dhauladhar is his debut novel. The technical content of the novel, namely the setting up of a hydro-project is drawn from his experience in these projects since 2005, as are many of the characters inspired from those whom he encountered on site.
Kochery C Shibu was born in Kochi and now lives in Bangalore with his wife and daughter.


TL;DR: A book with very detailed descriptions of events that is sure to be liked by people who like description over dialogue


What do you prefer?

Description, dialogue or action?

Tell me in the comments below or on my Instagram @the_food_and_book_life

Book review, Received for Review

Chanakya by Ashok K. Banker

Statistics

Format: Paperback IMG_20180807_163755-01-01-min

Length: 156 pages

Genre: Fiction, Historic Fiction

Publisher: Westland Publications

Date of Publication: 25th June, 2018

Rating: 4/5 stars

Disclaimer: I received a free copy of the book in exchange for an honest review


I love the books that are sent by WritersMelon for review. They are usually well written and well edited. I was really excited when they had this book up for grabs since Historic Fiction is my favorite genre and kept my fingers crossed that I am approved for it.


The Blurb

“Jurist, war strategist, kingmaker. Master administrator. Author of the Arthashastra. But before the legend, there was the boy: Vishnu Gupta.

Pataliputra, capital of the great Nanda empire, is teeming with crime and corruption. Granted unlimited authority by the hedonistic emperor Mahapadma Nanda, evil mastermind Maha-amatya Kartikeya has the city in a vice-like grip.

But another name bubbles up through the chaos; there is talk of a young genius, Vishnu Gupta. When the Maha-amatya investigates the rumours, he recognises a future rival in the boy. He is determined to destroy this competition from the roots – family and all. Vishnu must gather all his wits and his formidable knowledge to protect everything he holds dear. The holy scriptures, his brilliant interpretations of the Vedas and the power of his unmatched mind: these are the only tools he has against the might of the most powerful man in the empire.

Epic storyteller Ashok K. Banker imagines the life and formative years of India’s greatest genius, a man whose influence persists down the ages. In this first installment of a thrilling trilogy, he recreates Chanakya’s early struggles and triumphs.

The Book

It is always wonderful to discover the stories behind history especially Indian history. I always feel like there aren’t enough stories to cover the intricacies that have occurred over the past centuries.

We have all grown up studying Chanakya and his Neethis A.K.A his Rules of Justice. Chanakya’s Arthashastra is said to have played a role in the formation of the Indian constitution. We all know of Chanakya as a serious and wise Brahmin so it was wonderful to see him portrayed as a boy of seven. Although fictitious, I fell in love with the wily little boy who routinely outsmarts adults. The author was descriptive and I could vividly picture the entire Gupta family and the courtiers of Pataliputra.

The book had a lot of observations by the author that were worth re-reading. My favorite among them was-

It is with such tiny adjustments that we normalize evil. allow tyranny to make its house within our democratic mind, permit the erosion of freedom and justice by those who warp and bend it to serve their own ends. The intelligent mind questions and doubts everything; devious oppressors know this and use it to force us to question even the most stark facts. Whom will you believe, the tyrant asks, me, or your own lying eyes and senses?

I also applaud the author for touching on sensitive issues such as human trafficking and corruption at all echelons of power. It was interesting to see that the problems that the society faced in the 300-200 B.C are still prevalent in modern day society and the powers to be are still trying to curb the society of these menaces. Vishnu Gupta’s understanding of the inner workings of the delicate political hierarchy was invigorating to read. I can’t wait to read the next book in this aptly named ‘Itihasa’ series!

Although a short read, it was fast paced and packed a lot of happenings. I finished the book in a single day and I cannot wait to read the rest of the story.

The Author

Ashok K. Banker is the internationally acclaimed author of over 60 books that have sold over 3 million copies in 21 languages and 61 countries. His hugely successful Ramayana series is credited with having launched the genre of English-language mythological retellings and influenced an entire generation of authors.

An Irish-Portuguese-Sri Lankan-Indian born in Mumbai, Ashok now lives in USA with his family. He has worked as a journalist and as a screenwriter and can be found online here.

His work include:

  1. Ramayana series
    • Prince of Ayodhya
    • Siege of Mithila
    • Demons of Chitraka
    • Armies of Hanuman
    • Bridge of Rama
    • King of Ayodhya
    • Vengeance of Ravana
    • Sons of Sita
  2. Mahabharata series
    • The Forest of Stories
    • The Seeds of War
    • The Children of Midnight
    • The Darkness Before Dawn
    • The Eclipse of Dharma
    • The Sons of Misrule
    • The Kingdom of Beasts
  3. Itihasa series
    • Ten Kings
    • Ashoka: Lion of Mayura
    • Ashoka: Satrap of Taxila
    • Ashoka: Master of Magadha
    • Shivaji
  4. Crime Novels
    • The Iron Bra
    • Murder & Champagne
    • Ten Dead Admen
    • Blood Red Sari
    • Burnt Safron Sky
    • Silver Acid Rain
    • Rust Black Heart
  5. Romance
    • Love Stories from the Mahabharata
    • Bombay Times
  6. Science Fiction
    • Gods of War
    • Vortal: Shockwave
    • Awaken
  7. Short Fiction
    • My Father Drank My Lover and Other Stories

TL;DR: A real page turner that will steal your heart and make you wish for more


Do you like Historic Fiction?

What is your favorite book in that genre?

Tell me in the comments below or on my Instagram @the_food_and_book_life

Book review, Received for Review

Semmaari: A Lamb’s Gamble by Semura, Translated by Anantha Venkataraman

Statistics

Format: Paperback

Length: 212 pages

Genre: Historic Fiction, Indian Literature

Publisher: Notion Press

First Publication: 27th July, 2018

Rating: 3/5 stars

Disclaimer: I received a free copy of the book in exchange for an honest review


I was contacted by the author on Goodreads to give his book a read. I am always on the hunt for Indian mythology or historic fiction and this seemed perfect for those genres. This was also to be my first book translated from an Indian regional language and I was very excited.


The Blurb

It is just a game. What could possibly go wrong?

Everything!

Something that begins as a humble game, topples the world for a shepherd, Semmaari. His intelligence catapults him to the peaks of glory, but, little did he know that greed, betrayal and envy have dug deep trenches for him to fall.

In this game of ‘lambs & tigers’, where the shepherd is just a sheep, will the lambs escape the snarling jaws of the tigers with wit, courage and love, or, will the tigers prevail, with their rage, agility and cunningness?

The Book

The book is based on Aadu Puli Aattam, the traditional game of Lambs and Tigers. It begins with the writer’s family going on a holiday only to discover an ancient game of Lambs and Tigers and the story behind it. The story then moves to the period of history where Kings routinely sponsored artists to adorn their courts and kingdoms. I loved the little history lesson that the author inserted into the story. The description of how sculptors discovered a standardized method of measuring time and distance was mesmerizing.

While the first one-third of the book was well written, the parts that followed were filled with spelling errors and grammatical inconsistencies. I was apprehensive about the story and dialogues being lost in translation and I was proved right in certain pages. The sentences that may have had a musical tone while written in Tamil seemed repetitive when translated into English. Having said that, the author and the translator have both made enormous efforts to make sure that words in regional languages have a translation in parenthesis.

The wit of the shepherd was fun to read. Most of the parts in the last half of the book seemed too good to be true in reality but the book read as a story that can be used to teach children the importance of never giving up and the merits of thinking on their feet. It was a quick read at 212 pages but the story although interesting, could have been made more snappy with better editing.

The Author

Samura is an avid follower of Dr. APJ Abdul Kalaam. He is an engineer with an origin in Chennai. He worked with Microsoft earlier and is now employed as a Software Development Director at Oracle, Bangalore.

His work was very well received among the readers and BOFTA film institute students who expressed interest to convert a few of them into short films.

His work include:

  1. Siliconpuram (2016): An anthology of short stories
  2. Semmaari (2018)

TL;DR: A quick read that is sure to interest readers who love historic fiction


Have you read books that have been translated from other languages?

Tell me your experience in the comments below or on my Instagram @the_food_and_book_life