Book review

Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo

Statistics

Format: eBook (Kindle)

Length: 358 pages

Genre: Fantasy, Young Adult

Publisher: Henry and Holt Company

Date of Publication: 5th June, 2012

Rating: 5/5 stars


Shadow and Bone is the first book in the Grishaverse Trilogy. I’ve been wanting to read the series ever since I read Six of Crows. Hearing that the book is going to be adapted into an 8-episode series by Netflix meant that I absolutely had to read the books before that.


The Blurb

Surrounded by enemies, the once-great nation of Ravka has been torn in two by the Shadow Fold, a swath of near impenetrable darkness crawling with monsters who feast on human flesh. Now its fate may rest on the shoulders of one lonely refugee.

Alina Starkov has never been good at anything. But when her regiment is attacked on the Fold and her best friend is brutally injured, Alina reveals a dormant power that saves his life—a power that could be the key to setting her war-ravaged country free. Wrenched from everything she knows, Alina is whisked away to the royal court to be trained as a member of the Grisha, the magical elite led by the mysterious Darkling.

Yet nothing in this lavish world is what it seems. With darkness looming and an entire kingdom depending on her untamed power, Alina will have to confront the secrets of the Grisha . . . and the secrets of her heart.

The Book

The book begins with Alina, an orphan from Ravka describing her days in the First Army and reminiscing about her past spent with her best friend Mal. The Grishaverse universe with its vast open plains and severe tundra climates as well as the character names are influenced by Russia. Leigh admits that the Darkness/Darkling is a metaphor for the evil that lurks within all of us.

I had already seen so many memes on Alina, Mal and the Darkling that I had formed an opinion about each of them. However, the magic of Bardugo meant that all those opinions were shattered and I was left reeling with the amount of character development that was done for each character, no matter how small. The descriptions of Botkin and the other Grishas in the Small Palace or the descriptions of the grandeur of the King’s palace or the beauty of Morozova’s herd left me salivating for more.

Although the premise of a sickly orphan girl discovering a power within herself that she didn’t know she had, her best friend whom she is secretly in love with ignoring her for prettier women, a dark prince noticing the heroine and her blooming under his care seems to be the way that every other YA story goes, there was just something about the way that the story was woven together and the characters that were created made the story very gripping. I could not stop reading the book and I can’t wait to see what the next book in the series will reveal.

The Author

Leigh Bardugo is a #1 New York Times bestselling author of fantasy novels and the creator of the Grishaverse. With over two million copies sold, her Grishaverse spans the Shadow and Bone Trilogy, the Six of Crows Duology, and The Language of Thorns—with more to come.

Her short stories can be found in multiple anthologies, including The Best of Tor.com and the Best American Science Fiction & Fantasy. Her other works include Wonder Woman: Warbringer and the forthcoming Ninth House. Leigh was born in Jerusalem, grew up in Southern California, graduated from Yale University, and has worked in advertising, journalism, and even makeup and special effects. These days, she lives and writes in Los Angeles, where she can occasionally be heard singing with her band.


TL;DR: A fast paced book that is sure to make you want to try and complete the entire series in a single sitting


Do you like TV adaptations of your favourite books?

Tell me in the comments below or on my Instagram @thefoodandbooklife

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Book review

Siege and Storm by Leigh Bardugo

Statistics

Format: eBook (Kindle)

Length: 435 pages

Genre: Fantasy, Fiction

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

Date of Publication: 4th June, 2013

Rating: 5/5 stars


The second of the Grishaverse series, I read this book immediately after the first. I found it even more riveting than Shadow and Bone and cannot wait to read the next book in the series


The Blurb

Hunted across the True Sea, haunted by the lives she took on the Fold, Alina must try to make a life with Mal in an unfamiliar land. She finds starting new is not easy while keeping her identity as the Sun Summoner a secret. She can’t outrun her past or her destiny for long.

The Darkling has emerged from the Shadow Fold with a terrifying new power and a dangerous plan that will test the very boundaries of the natural world. With the help of a notorious privateer, Alina returns to the country she abandoned, determined to fight the forces gathering against Ravka. But as her power grows, Alina slips deeper into the Darkling’s game of forbidden magic, and farther away from Mal. Somehow, she will have to choose between her country, her power, and the love she always thought would guide her–or risk losing everything to the oncoming storm.

The Book

The book begins where the first book left off. We are treated to the Sun Summoner and her ilk injured and fleeing the Darkling and his army. They now need to find a safe haven to rest and recuperate. They are saved by the Apparat’s army and are led to the underground caves by them. It is now that the actual siege and actual storm begin.

I always find that I like the second book in a series better than any other. It happened with the ACOTAR series, the Winternight series and now with the Grisha series. This book lets us really get to know the characters. We learn why they behave the way they do and what makes them tick. Here the Darkling-Alina-Mal triangle gets complicated with Nikolai added to it but it gets more fun as well. We don’t see too much of moping from Alina which was very annoying in Shadow and Bone. I still wish that fantasy authors stayed away from the ordinary -girl-who-was-invisible-until-she-discovers-that-she has-powers-gets-an-army-of-suitors trope, I found that I quite liked reading this series. I honestly was rooting was Mal all through the series and he is my favourite tragic character.

The Author

Leigh Bardugo is a #1 New York Times bestselling author of fantasy novels and the creator of the Grishaverse. With over two million copies sold, her Grishaverse spans the Shadow and Bone Trilogy, the Six of Crows Duology, and The Language of Thorns—with more to come. Her short stories can be found in multiple anthologies, including The Best of Tor.com and the Best American Science Fiction & Fantasy. Her other works include Wonder Woman: Warbringer and the forthcoming Ninth House. Leigh was born in Jerusalem, grew up in Southern California, graduated from Yale University, and has worked in advertising, journalism, and even makeup and special effects. These days, she lives and writes in Los Angeles, where she can occasionally be heard singing with her band.


TL;DR: A fast paced and action filled book that will make you crave for the next book


What are your favourite fantasy series?

Tell me in the comments below or on my Instagram @the_food_and_book_life

Book club, Book review, Readathon

The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden

Statistics

Format: Paperback

Length: 430 pages

Genre: Fantasy, Fiction, Historic Fiction, Young Adult

Publisher: Del Ray

Date of Publication: 5th October, 2017

Rating: 5/5 stars


I received this book as a part of the January 2018 Aurora Box of Dreams. I had in fact, requested this book in place of their BOTM but as happens with the best laid plans, I just didn’t seem to be able to begin reading this book for nearly a year. With the end of 2018 fast approaching, I had a few book blog goals to complete. One of them was to read books that were on my shelf for too long. First of such books was All the Bright Places which I received as a birthday present from my Bookstagram buddies and next was The Bear and the Nightingale.

Even with this goal in mind, I did not seem to find the inclination to start reading the book. I knew it received good reviews, I was sure that I would love it but I just did not seem to begin. Finally I saw that ecstatic yet chaotic had a readathon planned for this book and the next book in the series and I took it as an opportunity to begin reading. We also plan to read the next book in the series, The Girl in the Tower in time for the release of the last book of the trilogy, The Winter of the Witch.

The book is the first in the Winternight trilogy and has won several accolades like Locus Award Nominee for Best First Novel (2018)Goodreads Choice Award Nominee for Fantasy & for Debut Goodreads Author (2017)HWA Debut Crown Nominee for Longlist (2017)


The Blurb

“‘Frost-demons have no interest in mortal girls wed to mortal men. In the stories, they only come for the wild maiden.’ 

In a village at the edge of the wilderness of northern Russia, where the winds blow cold and the snow falls many months of the year, an elderly servant tells stories of sorcery, folklore and the Winter King to the children of the family, tales of old magic frowned upon by the church.

But for the young, wild Vasya these are far more than just stories. She alone can see the house spirits that guard her home, and sense the growing forces of dark magic in the woods… “

The Book

The book begins with the description of little Vasya and her rebellious excursions to the forest. I didn’t like the heroine much in the beginning but she grew on me as the story progressed. The book is fast paced with plenty of fantasy creatures that delight the reader. The influence from Russia for the landscape, the names, and the culture was very intriguing. The monsters and the demons were quite different from what we usually find and I found some of them particularly cute.

I was very glad that the author included both strong and open-minded men as well as weak, power-hungry, and superstitious ones in the story. I was even more glad to see strong female characters for  the little girl to draw inspiration from. What I really loved though, was the world building. It made everything come alive, especially the Winter King and his treasure. I was also intrigued about the subtle message to the reader regarding the importance of tradition and the call to not discard the old ways in favour of the new but to integrate them both together.

The Author

Born in Texas, Katherine studied French and Russian at Middlebury College. She has lived abroad in France and in Moscow, among other places. She has also lived in Hawaii, where she wrote much of The Bear and the Nightingale. She currently lives in Vermont.

Her work include:

  1. The Bear and the Nightingale (2017)
  2. The Girl in the Tower (2017)
  3. The Winter of the Witch (2019)

TL;DR: A fast paced book with plenty of fantasy creatures that delight and a world building that makes everything come alive.


Have you completed your reading goals for 2018?

What were they?

Tell me in the comments below or on my Instagram @thefoodandbooklife

Book review, Received for Review

Sophie Washington: Secret Santa by Tonya Duncan Ellis

Statistics

Format: Paperback 

Length: 120 pages

Genre: Children’s Fiction

Publisher: Page Turner Publishing

Date of Publication: 9th September, 2018

Rating: 5/5 stars

Disclaimer: I received a free copy of the book in exchange for an honest review


Kay Macleod organised an Indie Advent Calendar like she has been doing for the last two years. Through the advent calendar I met several authors and Tonya was one of them. I love reading children’s fiction. This seemed to be the perfect read for the Christmas season and I was very excited to read it.


The Blurb

Santa Claus is Coming to Town

Christmas is three weeks away and a mysterious “Santa” has been mailing presents to sixth grader Sophie Washington in this adorable, illustrated chapter book for middle grade readers. There is no secret Santa gift exchange going on at her school, so she can’t imagine who it could be. Sophie’s best friends, Chloe, Valentina, and Mariama guess the gift giver is either Nathan Jones or Toby Johnson, two boys in Sophie’s class who have liked her in the past, but she’s not so sure.

Sophie uncovers clues to find her secret Santa and the final reveal is bigger than any package she’s opened on Christmas morning. It’s a holiday surprise she’ll never forget!

The Book

The story revolves around sixth grader Sophie Washington, her family and friends, especially her little brother Cole with his corny jokes who was my favourite. It is almost time for christmas break when sophie begins to receive packages from her Secret Santa. In the boxes she finds her favourite candies, a gingerbread house, and jewelry. She racks her brain to figure out who could be sending things to her and how they know what her favourite things are.

Along with this vein of mystery, the book also has other important aspects like dealing with bullies, forgiveness, and the importance of friendship and which makes it a wholesome read. I was reminded of Enid Blyton books because of the very clear distinction between right and wrong, good family values, and kids who are still innocent and likable. I now desparately want to read all the books in the series for their feel good factor.

The Author

Tonya Duncan Ellis is the author of the Reader’s Favorite “Five Star” rated Sophie Washington children’s books series, geared toward readers ages 8 to 12 and is a member of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI). She has received awards for literary excellence and worked as a journalist and freelance magazine writer.

Tonya was born and raised in Louisville, KY and has also lived in Michigan, South Carolina, Louisiana, Missouri, Indiana, London, England, and Strasbourg, France. She currently resides in Houston, TX. When she’s not writing, the author enjoys reading, biking, swimming, travel and spending time with her husband and three children. 

Her work include:
1. Sophie Washington: Queen of the Bee (2013)

2. Sophie Washington: Things you Didn’t Know About Sophie (2013)

3. Sophie Washington: The Snitch (2014)

4. Sophie Washington: The Gamer (2017)

5. Sophie Washington: Hurricane (2018)

6. Sophie Washington: Mission Costa Rica (2018)

7. Sophie Washington: Secret Santa (2018)


TL;DR: A feel good book with mystery, humor and wholesome values


What did you do this Christmas season?

Tell me in the comments below or on my Instagram @the_food_and_book_life

Book review, Received for Review

A Flight of Broken Wings by Nupur Chowdhury

Statistics

Format: eBook (Kindle) IMG_20180928_131021_747.jpg

Length: 313 pages

Genre: Fiction, Fantasy

Publisher: Self-published

Date of Publication: 18th August, 2018

Rating: 4/5 stars

Disclaimer: I received a free copy of the book in exchange for an honest review


I enjoy reading fantasy and was pleased when the author asked me to review the book. It is the first book in the series- The Aeriel Chronicles and I look forward to reading more from the author.


The Blurb

Six hundred years ago, humanity rose up in revolt against the Aeriels, who were driven from earth and back into their homeland of Vaan after a bloody and glorious war.

Eight years ago, Ruban’s home was destroyed and his family murdered by an Aeriel. 

When a new Aeriel threat looms over Ragah, the capital city of Vandram, Ruban Kinoh must do everything in his power to avenge his family’s past and protect the future of his country. 

Which is hard enough without being saddled with a pretty and pompous aristocrat, who seems as useless as he is vain. Faced with a conspiracy that might cost humanity its hard-won freedom, and accompanied by the bejeweled and glitter-clad Ashwin Kwan, Ruban begins his journey into a land where the past and the future intertwine.

The Book

The book begins with the Emancipation Day celebrations where we are given a hint to the state of the Earth after being freed of the dreaded Aeriel rule. Ruban is the world’s best Hunter and is tasked with a mission to protect the reinforced weapons and to hunt rogue Aeriels but also to his chagrin, to babysitting the aristocrat Ashwin from Zain. Ashwin appears to be the typical royal with his charm and pampered upbringing. He does not seem to realise the importance of keeping state secrets and loves to be the center of attention, giving TV interviews without consulting anyone. While Ruban laments his bad luck, he finds that making new friends may not be as bad as he thought. It certainly has its advantages, like his life being saved by the naive Zainian.

The descriptions of the Aeriels reminded me of my favourite TV series- Supernatural, with their white feathers, energy blasts and their ability to appear almost human. The author is very descriptive which lead the first couple of chapters to feel a tad long and winding. However, when the action began in the third and fourth chapters, I couldn’t get enough of the book. The relationship between the Hunting partners Ruban and Simani was very balanced and friendly with mutual love and respect. It was great to see that the author did not feel the need to add a romantic angle to the relationship as most authors are wont to do. It reaffirmed my belief that a book with a platonic relationship between members of opposite genders works just as well, or better than a book with a romantic theme. I also enjoyed the witty banter between Ruban, Vikram, and Ashwin. The conversations throughout the book were light and breezy and felt very real.

I was happy to see that there were no technical loopholes in the story even though the author had the task of keeping all the abilities of the Aeriels and their history straight. The powers of the sif and the energy beings were satisfactorily explained although I did spend the best part of three chapters wondering what a sif was. The only problem that I faced with the book was the lengthy descriptions towards the beginning and the end.  That however, is a personal opinion since I prefer dialogue and action over description. I am sure that readers who love descriptive writing will love these parts of the book. The middle third of the book was fast paced and kept me on my toes guessing what was going to happen next. My favourite character was Ashwin and I would love to read more of him in the next books of the series. I pat myself on the back for correctly guessing the perpetrator but that might just be the result of me having read too many books in the genre.

The Author

Apart from novels, Nupur Chowdhury enjoys writing poetry and the occasional short story. She was four when she started writing. Now, some 20 years later, it’s more an addiction than a hobby.

Nupur likes coffee, street food, fanfiction, and sleep. She dislikes yogurt, slow internet, unnecessary cliffhangers, and being woken up in the morning. You can find her on Facebook, Wattpad, Goodreads, and Amazon.

Her work includes:

  1. The Classroom Effect (2015)
  2. A Flight of Broken Wings (2018)

TL;DR: A fun fantasy with lovable characters that will make you want to keep reading till the very end


What are some of your favourite fantasy series?

Tell me in the comments below or on my Instagram @the_food_and_book_life

 

Book review, Received for Review

Aaru by David Meredith

Statistics

Format: eBook (Kindle)

BeautyPlus_20180816100250584_save-01-min

Length: 296 pages

Genre: Sci-Fi, Fantasy

Date of Publication: 9th July, 2017

Rating: 3/5 stars

Disclaimer: I received a free copy of the book in exchange for an honest review


It had been quite a long time since I read a Sci-Fi so when the author offered the book to me for review, I was very excited.


The Blurb

Rose is dying. Her body is wasted and skeletal. She is too sick and weak to move. Every day is an agony and her only hope is that death will find her swiftly before the pain grows too great to bear.

She is sixteen years old.

Rose has made peace with her fate, but her younger sister, Koren, certainly has not. Though all hope appears lost Koren convinces Rose to make one final attempt at saving her life after a mysterious man in a white lab coat approaches their family about an unorthodox and experimental procedure. A copy of Rose’s radiant mind is uploaded to a massive super computer called Aaru – a virtual paradise where the great and the righteous might live forever in an arcadian world free from pain, illness, and death. Elysian Industries is set to begin offering the service to those who can afford it and hires Koren to be their spokes-model.

Within a matter of weeks, the sisters’ faces are nationally ubiquitous, but they soon discover that neither celebrity nor immortality is as utopian as they think. Not everyone is pleased with the idea of life everlasting for sale.
What unfolds is a whirlwind of controversy, sabotage, obsession, and danger. Rose and Koren must struggle to find meaning in their chaotic new lives and at the same time hold true to each other as Aaru challenges all they ever knew about life, love, and death and everything they thought they really believed.

The Book

I loved how the author introduced a concept of two sisters who are torn from each other before their time. Add to this the tragedy of a young life snuffed out by cancer and the unrealised hopes of a brilliant and athletic girl who is ridden hopeless by the disease, we have a moving story on our hands. For a book that is only 296 pages long, there were quite a lot of pages that I had to gloss over. The descriptions felt a bit too long and winding to me, but that might very well be a very personal opinion.

The real story begins after Rose enters Aaru. Aaru is the make-believe equivalent of the heaven (or is the very concept of heaven of any kind make-believe? That’s a topic of discussion for another day) that we all crave to enter after our time on earth has come to a pass. The place is beautiful, the Vedas can manipulate their surroundings and their appearance at will and the people there are nice and helpful. Add to this the Harm Failsafe, and we practically have a place where misery and pain cannot exist.

The concept of Aaru was beautifully rendered. The creativity of the author was visible in the world that he had the characters create. The hierarchies and the ability of each person were very unique and deserved applause. However, I felt that the twist at the end was a bit too derivative and unnecessary. It could be the set-up for the next books in the series but it’s execution here felt hurried and half-hearted. After all the build-up that the author gave, the conclusion left a lot to be desired.

I, however liked the story for its unique concept if not for the execution.

The Author

David Meredith is a writer and educator originally from Knoxville, Tennessee. He received both a Bachelor of Arts and a Master of Arts and then received his Doctorate in Educational Leadership. He spent nearly a decade, from 1999-2010 teaching English in Northern Japan, but currently lives with his wife and three children in the Nashville Area where he continues to write and teach English.

His work include:

  1. The Reflections of Queen Snow White (2013)
  2. Aaru- The Aaru Cycle Book 1 (2017)
  3. Aaru- Halls of Hell Book 2 (2018)

TL;DR: A unique concept with a lot of creative thought that is sure to interest fans of Sci-Fi and Fantasy.


Do you read a lot of Sci-Fi?

What is your favourite book in the genre?

Tell me in the comments below or on my Instagram @the_food_and_book_life

Book review

No Ordinary Star by M. C. Frank

Statistics

Format: Kindle IMG_20180516_174358_HHT-01-01-01-min

Length: 157 pages

Genre: Sci-Fi, Dystopian, Young Adult

Publisher: Createspace

Rating: 4/5 stars

Disclaimer: I received a free copy of the book in exchange for an honest review


As you know, I am a part of the street team for M. C. Frank. I have already reviewed Lose Me. and Ruined for her. This time however, M. C is holding a giveaway for No Ordinary Star which lets people download a free copy of her book and that is how I ended up with one of the most fun reads for me this month.


The Blurb

“A soldier is summoned to the North Pole, days before the year changes, told to fix the great Clock for a celebration. He has no idea what to do. 
A girl, hunted for the crime of being born, almost dies out on the ice. She is rescued by the last polar bear left alive. 
A library waits for them both, a library built over a span of a hundred years, forgotten in the basement of an ice shack. 
The world hasn’t known hunger or sickness in hundreds of years. It has also forgotten love and beauty. 
The year is 2525. 

Inspired by the short stories of Ray Bradbury, this futuristic novel is set in a world where Christmas -among other things- is obsolete and a Clock is what keeps the fragile balance of peace. 

Written in three installments, this is the breathtaking and sensual story of how two unlikely people change the world, and each other, one book at a time. 

Immerse yourself into the icy cold world of this scorching hot new novel.

The Book

No Ordinary Star begins with the description of a soldier on his daily drill. Everything seems normal and it is only later that we discover that the story is set in the future, the end of the year 2524 to be exact. Felix the soldier is no ordinary soldier. He does not need to sleep and his source of nutrition is a little pill. So is the case with everyone on Earth and all its colonies across the galaxy. He is the epitome of an obedient and loyal soldier.. that is, until he is summoned to the icy depths of the North Pole.

The soldier who has almost never seen the real outdoors is in for quite a shock when he discovers that nature tends to get cold, dark and cruel. He must use whatever he can to survive but he is in luck because he rescues Astra the girl who’s only crime is that she is the daughter of her father. Together they discover the hidden treasures of the Ice Shack. Felix begins to turn from an emotionless drone to an actual human being while Astra begins to learn to read and discovers the joy to be found in books.

The Soldier and the Match Girl are to save new year’s eve and by extension the whole world by fixing a clock left incomplete by the Clock Master. With one partner never having lived in the real world and the other not taught to read or count, this seems like a tough task indeed. My favourite part of the story was when Astra and Felix read the story of the Steadfast Soldier and even though concepts of love and beauty are alien to them, it manages to move them to tears. Astra saying “I will save yours right back” to Felix’s “You haven’t thanked me for saving your life” shows the kind of girl that she is. Gutsy, witty and full of spunk, my favourite kind of character.

The book is the first of three parts and characteristically ends on a cliff hanger. I cannot wait to get started on No Plain Rebel and really sink my teeth into the story. I would love to discover more of Astra’s backstory and find more scenes involving Ursa the last polar bear.


TL;DR: A short and fast paced read that is set in the future with a whole new world for the reader to discover.


Do you like stories set in the future to be dystopian or not?

Tell me in the comments below or on my Instagram @the_food_and_book_life

Book review

A Court of Frost and Starlight by Sarah J. Mass

Statistics

Format: eBook (Kindle) Screenshot_20180513-165301-01-min

Length: 272 pages

Genre: Fantasy, Young Adult

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

Rating: 5/5 stars


If you have been following my blog since it’s conception in 2017, I started it with a review of the ACOTAR series. It has continued to be one my favourite series till date. I remember the excitement of waiting for new Harry Potter books to be released and pre-booking them months in advance. The excitement that I felt when I heard that A Court of Frost and Starlight was to be released in May was akin to that and that is saying something since I am a certifiable Potterhead. This was the 1st book that I coveted immediately after release apart from the Harry Potter series and I am glad to announce that it met my expectations and then some.


The Blurb

Months after the explosive events in A Court of Wings and Ruin, Feyre, Rhys and their companions are still busy rebuilding the Night Court and the vastly changed world beyond. But Winter Solstice is finally near, and with it a hard-earned reprieve. Yet even the festive atmosphere can’t keep the shadows of the past from looming. As Feyre navigates her first Winter Solstice as High Lady, she finds that those dearest to her have more wounds than she anticipated – scars that will have a far-reaching impact on the future of their Court.

The Book

A Court of Frost and Sunlight starts a while after the big war that A Court of Wings and Ruin ended at and is narrated from the points of view of various members of the Night Court. It shows how everyone is dealing in the aftermath. It is a book that deals with loss and courage in face of adversity and shows the strength that is required by an individual to carry on with his life even if it feels like everything has been lost.

The story is set during the winter solstice. It is the perfect time to base a story set in the Night Court. The descriptions of the beautiful land with the snow and frost covering made me wish that I was transported there as well. Feyre, Rhys and their Inner Circle are devastated with all the death around them. Being the kind of people they are, they feel responsible for each death and are miserable to have caused so much of destruction. Each member of the Court of Dreams is taking part in the rebuilding of the new ‘wall-less’ world in their own way. Here we see much more of Elaine and I am glad that she is now slowly but surely turning into a strong lady even without her gifts. Amren is adjusting to her new Fae body as is Nesta but the latter is doing everything that she can to resist. I just wish it had more scenes for my favourite character of the series- Azriel.

I was pleased to see that the book was realistic about the fact that no matter how much anyone tries to help, certain situations get better only with time. It is not the number of people who surround us or the support that they offer that matter but how we feel inside. It is a sweet story with not too many twists or action and made for a nice and pleasant read. We are treated to the inner workings of all of their minds and we get an in-depth look into each character to fall in love with all over again. I was glad that Sarah did not try to have a ‘happily ever after’ ending to the book even as she was dealing with tragedies in her personal life. It serves as the perfect launching pad to the next book in the series that I am already waiting for with baited breath.


TL;DR: A perfect next step in the series with beautiful descriptions of people and places that makes for a very pleasant read.


What is your favourite ACOTAR character?

Tell me in the comments below or on my Instagram @the_food_and_book_life

Book review, Received for Review

Atto’s Tale by Brindi Quinn

Statistics

Format: eBook (Kindle) Screenshot_20180501-154628-02-min

Length: 326 pages

Genre: Fantasy, Romance

Rating: 5/5 stars

Disclaimer: I received a free copy of the book from the author in exchange for an honest review.


As a part of the Brindi Quinn Street Team of Review Warriors, I had the chance to read all of Brindi’s books. I fell in love with her style of writing from the very first book.

Atto’s Tale is the last of 4 books in the Farellah series and is set in the modern day. It is touted as a spin-off but to me, it felt like the natural progression in the series. It concentrated on my favourite character and I loved everything about the book as is evident in the rating.


The Blurb

This is the beautiful, not-so-tragic tale of a girl with a stolen soul. I am that girl and this is my story. Let’s start at the beginning. 

We are surrounded by deep, glowing purple. That’s when it comes back to me. Everything. A songstress. An Elf. And a Daem, legendary man of shadow. A quest to save the world from a destructive song. An angelic truth learned too late. A choice made too early. A dragon. A goldness. A love. At once the fire dies. The crystal fades. Atto and I stand face-to-face in darkness. Silent darkness surrounds us a long, long while, until Atto finally musters the courage to speak: “What is my name?” 

The journey continues in this Heart of Farellah spinoff! A not-so-small something, reborn lives, and the curse of the wind. What else lies in store for Atto and Aurelia?

The Book

Let me start by saying that all through the first three books of the series, I kept wishing for more of Ardette and when I found out that the last book concentrates on him, I was in a great big hurry to get to it. I was definitely not disappointed. I had my heart’s fill of Ardette from the very first chapter.

The story is set in the modern day and shows Aurelia as a 19 year old clumsy girl with a fear of open spaces. Atto enters her life and changes everything that she thinks she knows about the world. Up until this book, the only problem that I had with Brindi’s writing was that even though her female characters were strong, they would wait for the males in the story to help them out and let the males make decisions. I was really pleased to see that Aurelia thinks of herself as an equal. This shows especially in the scene at the beach side inn where Aurelia wants to stay up with Atto to wait the night out since Shane was her responsibility too. I still did not like the fact that all through the series, Aurelia is the only one who is in the dark regarding her rebirths but at least in this one she becomes aware and stops acting like a confused damsel in distress.

As is typical of Brindi Quinn books, Atto’s Tale too contained beautiful descriptions of the fantasy world. The rules that govern the magic are explained well without seeming to bore the readers. The story is fast paced with action packed into every other page. It was a fitting end to the series and I absolutely loved the book.


TL;DR: A fitting end to the series with an in-depth look into some of the beloved characters.


Do you prefer to read all books in a series one after the other or do you take breaks with other books in between?

Tell me in the comments below or on my Instagram @the_food_and_book_life